Uruguay: La Vida Nocturna

Uruguay: La Vida Nocturna

What do you know about nightlife, or la vida nocturna, in Uruguay? 

It comes late, just like dinner here. And if dinner comes at 10pm, I’ll let you guess: When do people start going out?

“11pm?”

How cute!

“Midnight?!” 

Quizás ya estén haciendo la previa, quizás al menos una persona esté en el bar (maybe they’re pregaming; maybe at least one person is at the bar)

“1am?!!”

Well, maybe – but if you go to the club (el boliche) at that hour, it’s going to be kinda dead.

“2am??!!!¿”

BINGO, and be prepared to stay until... 

“4am?”

Are you in diapers? La noche está en pañales!

“5am¿¡”

No tenés que madrugar para el trabajo hoy por favorrrrrr, compra otro fernet pues!

“6am!!!!!!!?1!?1”

But that’s too early to walk back home with the sunrise, no salimos antes del amanecer pelotuda!

“7am..................”

That’s respectable, pero no le sacas a ese tipo de algún lado? Le deberías bailar!!!

“EIGHT IN THE MORNING” 

ffffffffffaaaaaaa I’m not even tired anymore, let’s go to your house y desayunar con tostadas y mantequilla y mermelada y café con crema ~

La salida del sol después de una noche de baile. Fray Bentos, Uruguay.

La salida del sol después de una noche de baile. Fray Bentos, Uruguay.


I’ve been in Uruguay for two months, trying to build up the endurance to stay out until the early hours of the morning. 

I tried on the first week (went to a boliche in my town called El Carajo — no te jodo), but caved at 3AM (that’s still pretty impressive for me; me puedo convertir en abuelita)

I tried again two weeks ago (almost as if it took me the whole time in-between the first week and then to recover...), was pretty impressed by how late we arrived to the bar (it was already packed instead of empty! We ACTUALLY had difficulty finding a table to lean against, and it didn’t feel like a ghost bar in the wild wild west!), but, again, got all wine and cheese-tired and caved in at around 2AM.

But.

BUT.

But...

This past Saturday, a few friends and I stayed out until 8AM. I still can’t believe it — but I kind of can, because I remember my energy surprising me. Around 3AM, it dipped — but then after a certain point, I became too delirious to be tired. We then walked back home along the sunrise, and it felt like a movie. Maybe The Sandlot, in those scenes where the kids walk back at sunset, wheeling their bikes.

So, advice for you travelers, or people who may be moving here: If you’re going to romper la noche, take a siesta.

Below, see photos of us rompiendo la noche:

Cool and rompiendo even in her unconscious finger-grasp of the phone.

Cool and rompiendo even in her unconscious finger-grasp of the phone.

Yo capturada al evitar el capturer.

Yo capturada al evitar el capturer.

Patricia, una cerveza nacional, con pizza.

Patricia, una cerveza nacional, con pizza.

Yo dirigiendo el capturar.

Yo dirigiendo el capturar.

Sarah Simon is a regular Slide Night contributor and currently based in Uruguay on a Fulbright scholarship. See more of her writing here.

Sarah is also publishing her book this Spring with Adelaide Books, core collection: poems about eating disorders. Find Sarah on Instagram and follow #uruguayumbrage for more.